8mm, heart-shaped hell

8mm, heart-shaped hell

Following in our nostalgic-tinged soundscape-leaning pattern, noir pop duo 8MM – Juliette Beavan and Sean Beavan – we hear a little 90s pop woven in with their quintessential sound in “Self-Inflicted Heartache”, the first track off their new released Heart-Shaped Hell. As you may have guessed, the soundscape twists and turns after that, a bit more edge to “Supercrush” before leading into a true pop single with the title track, somehow delivered with an eery twist. “Bring It On” is the most moody of them all, the second half growing powerful with the added male vocals. The pair round it out nicely with “Move With Me” and its accompanying radio edit, slower paced, but filled with emotional range to keep you on a sort of edge regardless.

Stay on edge with Heart-Shaped Hell. It’s a wonderful experience.

Keep up with 8MM here.

host, adolescent content

host, adolescent content

Electro-pop stunner Host released her debut EP this week, and you’re in for a real party with Adolescent Content. And – though the lyrics sometimes take a turn for the more serious, like third track “Taste of Your Love” and the way it highlights a breakup – the entire EP is something that will get your heart pumping and leave that glittery, enticing feeling of nostalgia in your veins.

“Goodbye” is sugar sweet 80’s pop, something you immediately feel like you need to bop your head to while wearing a pastel windbreaker. Host’s vocals dim the electric energy slightly, but only to give it a moody, ethereal feel. Second track “B4me” of course follows suit, but is led by ints interesting percussive aspects. It’s one of those songs that, for half of it, you’re not really sure how to dance to it. But it’s intriguing and beautiful as well, not unlike chaotic predecessor “Taste of Your Love”. By the time we get to “Forgetting Me”, we are ready for the slight pace change, luring us into a hypnotic spell with its drawn out notes and swirling soundscape.

Keep up with Host here.

the long ryders, psychedelic country soul

the long ryders, psychedelic country soul

Originally formed in 1981, Los Angeles-based alt-country rock collective The Long Ryders may have been through a few lineup changes over the years, but they’re back and strong as ever with new full length Psychedelic Country Soul. Within this twelve track stunner, Sid Griffin, Stephen McCarthy, Tom Stevens, and Greg Sowders have developed a truly enjoyable work of art, beginning with the easygoing sounds of “Greenville” and bouncing all the way through to the title track in slot twelve.

But of course those aren’t the only two songs of note on this work. If you’re into names in songs – we’re still trying to find one for all of our friends – then “Molly Somebody” is perfect for you. You can choose to replace “Molly” with any name, but this story has some specificity to it that wouldn’t otherwise translate, so be aware before you try to declare your love with the grand gesture of song. “If You Want to See Me Cry” is a slow, beautiful track, the soundscape reflecting its melancholic title. Additionally, if you’re looking for the perfect backdrop for that next cross country road trip, “California” is pure perfection. You can imagine it playing in the background while driving on a back road, your hair blowing in the wind. (In slow motion of course.)

If you’re interested in new music with solid lyricism, a band with interesting history, and a little bit of twang, you will truly enjoy Psychedelic Country Soul. Take it for a spin below!

Keep up with The Long Ryders here.

lampland, no mood

lampland, no mood

Tommy Bazarian’s, known by his musical space Lampland, debut album No Mood is debuting with a thunderous wave of emotion and sounds that will make you sway.  Bazarian utilized his day job of being a radio producer to form the album’s lyrics, and his past formed the stories that are portrayed with drum loops, synths, and even a dash of some trumpets.

Bazarian’s vocals remind this listener faintly of The Smashing Pumpkins front man Billy Corgan. The whispering-moody feeling is definitely present throughout, but Bazarian makes it his own with his ability to compose unique music that is not like that of the loose comparison I have made.

This description on Lampland’s website, which you can find here, perfectly encapsulates what this debut album brings to the table sonically:

“In the spirit of Paul Simon’s solo albums, No Mood features almost as many genres as tracks. Alt-country rockers sit next to Elliott Smith four-track recordings, followed by dramatic full band arrangements. It’s all held together by Bazarian’s distinctive voice, by his vivid lyrics, and by his restless energy. Which, by the end of the album, he’s come to accept. ‘I know that you don’t blink insanely’, he sings. ‘Well, I do.'”

You can find more information on Lampland and No Mood at https://www.lamplandband.com/.

be forest, knocturne

be forest, knocturne

Italian shoegaze musical act Be Forest – comprised of Costanza Delle Rose (Bass and vocals), Nicola Lampredi (Guitar), and Erica Terenzi (Drum, synths and vocals) – released their new full-length today, a swirling and intense collection of songs titled Knocturne. Beginning with the moody instrumental track “Atto I”, the soundscape doesn’t vary too much heading into “Empty Space”, though additional background vocals and reverb are layered in. By third track “Gemini”, you realize the soundscapes are all strikingly similar, and that you’re truly on an instrumental adventure that could not have been laid out – and taken as successfully – any other way. “K’ is most notable for its quirky percussion amidst the same whirring guitars and intense disposition as its predecessors.

“Sigfrido”, somehow, brings us into an even darker soundscape, making this work of art much moodier than Earthbeat, which came before it in 2014. This song belongs in a transformational film, and we’re backing that idea 100%. “Atto II” has the clear markings of its first, though definitely begins in a more mysterious place, eventually exploding into a cacophony of ominous sound.

“Bengala” has a much more noticeable 80s influence, the beginning bringing the mood back up slightly. It doesn’t altogether abandon the darkness, as there are guitar parts that simply belong on the Warped stage and iron out any feelings of overwhelming lightness we may have shifted into. We wonder most about the inspiration behind the track “Fragment”, as it is packed with finesse and strength, leading us perfectly into last track “You, Nothing” which simplifies the instrumental pace slightly, allowing us to really enjoy Costanza’s vocals.

Keep up with Be Forest here.

kaz murphy, ride out the storm

kaz murphy, ride out the storm

Kaz Murphy‘s music is about as Americana as it gets, and his newest release Ride Out The Storm is no exception.  This folk artist’s sound is that of the old west, forming stories with each lyric and melodic refrain.  Kaz has had an illustrious career, stemming from his beginnings as a lead-singer and drummer at age 10.  He established himself as a respected writer of musicals in the 1980s, transitioning to music after forming a folk new wave band in 1988.  Multitudes of bands and projects later, Murphy as come to Ride Out The Storm, which can be seen as a return to his roots.

Each track on this album paints a picture, forming simple, yet elegant, audio tapestries for us to envision while listening.  Stories of younger days, tough times, and perseverance are spread throughout the 11 song project.  While listening, I couldn’t help but think about my own difficult situations.  I also couldn’t help to make a vocal and sound comparisons to country-western artist Marty Robbins and the illustrious Johnny Cash.

For those looking to get lost in deep Americana story telling, then Ride Out The Storm is the album you must listen to.  Ride Out The Storm is out now.  You can visit Kaz Murphy’s website at https://kazmurphy.com/ for more information.