spoony bard, old friends

spoony bard, old friends

Old Friends – the new album from spoony bard – is out now, and it has everything an experimental music lover could ever want.  With Kid Cudi-esque melodies and Earl Sweatshirt flow, spoony bard is the alter-ego of musician David Nord.  Rap, funk, electronic, and a multitude of other genres and sounds can be discovered in Old Friends, perfectly displaying spoony bard’s range and influences.

With references to Game of Thrones, food, and pro skateboarders, the opening track “ego trippin par 99” hits hard, setting the tone for the rest of the album.  The following tracks have their own unique feel, no two being similar in sound or scope.  If I had to make any artistic comparison, it would have to be if you took Gorillaz and threw in Kid Cudi as their frontman.  Dash in some more traditional funk and 90’s rap and you get spoony bard, an artist not afraid to push boundaries, both sonically and lyrically.

Old Friends is out now on all major platforms. Keep up with spoony bard on his socials. Bandcamp | Facebook | Twitter

the yawpers, human question

the yawpers, human question

Denver-based rock trio The Yawpers – comprised of Nate Cook, Jesse Parmet, and Alex Koshak – released their new full-length Human Question on Friday, and we’ve been binging it like crazy. From the first, harsh chords of “Child of Mercy”, straight through the vintage edge of “Dancing on My Knees”, through to the end of the lighter feeling title track, The Yawpers have injected their quintessential oldies sound into each track, making it easier to transition from classic indie and rock into modern lyrical choices that seem to stem from the same origin.

While some of the songs are truly 60’d-infused kaleidoscopes (“Human Question”), it’s with songs like “Man As Ghost” and “Forgiveness Through Pain” that the Americana folk feel comes blazing at us full force. Our personal favorite is “Reason to Believe”, packed to the brim with soul.

What’s your favorite? Be sure to let us know on Facebook!

Keep up with The Yawpers here.

heart attack man, fake blood

heart attack man, fake blood

Cleveland-based rock outfit Heart Attack Man – comprised of Eric Egan (Vocals/Guitar), Adam Paduch (Drums), Tyler Sickels (Guitar), and Seamus Groman (Bass) – released their new 11-track full-length Fake Blood on Friday, and we have honestly been head bobbing to it all weekend. Though the names of the tracks (i.e. “Fake Blood”, “Blood Blister”, “Rats in a Bucket”) are hardly kosher for the holiday weekend – and might give your Aunt Susie her very own heart attack – the songs are entertaining. Intricately woven lyrics and hard bass lines make the album a concrete favorite, loaded with energy smothered in oughts punk influence that will keep you coming back for more.

Personal favorite tracks include “Moths in a Lampshade”, “Sugar Coated”, and “The Choking Game”, an obvious nod to a horrible pastime of the last decade. (And if you listen to the lyrics of “Sugar Coated”, please keep in mind revenge is not our game here.)

Get a taste for the album in its entirety below, and then let us know what you think over on the Facebook page!

Keep up with Heart Attack Man here.

diane coffee, internet arms

diane coffee, internet arms

Indiana-based self-proclaimed “psychedelic Motown” act Diane Coffee released their full-length Internet Arms today, and we’re swooning. From the very first, glittering notes of “Not Ready To Go”, we’re drawn in, carrying us through the slightly quicker tempo of “Like A Child Does” and into the slowdown of instrumental intro “The Look”. The fourth track remains at that slow pace, landing us in a neon trance while “Stuck In Your Saturday Night”.

It’s at this point that we recognize not only Diane Coffee’s palpable influence from The King of Pop, but there is a tad bit of Chromeo peeking through that seems to amplify the lyrics. While “Simulation” is one of our favorite tracks on the album, the title track definitely takes a more disco-like approach to its soundscape. “War” is another quick, swirling instrumental, leading into “Doubt”, which seems to be the most modern, intricate track of the bunch so far and a perfect staple for your latest playlist.

“Work It” is a new anthem for those reaching for their dreams, perfectly displaying the vocal range and attitude of this act. And while “Good Luck” slows it all down again, it is with “Lights Off” that we go deeper sonically, swapping the 80s synth for a more modern, dance hall beat. “Turn On” is a short instrumental, and sounds like you’re turning on a pretty complicated machine or robot. Though we agree with the inclusion of this quick transition, we think it’s better placed elsewhere – perhaps at the very beginning of the album -, as it then leads into the very slow, gorgeous “Company Man”. Once again, this track could easily have been placed in any one of our favorite 80’s movies, and therefore is the perfect way to round out such a wonderfully influenced and lyrically nuanced album.

Keep up with Diane Coffee here.

son of cloud, son of cloud

son of cloud, son of cloud

Brooklyn-based Son of Cloud released his self-titled full-length, a 10-track album that seems to mellifluously solve the world’s problems. We know that’s a strong claim, but if you even start to take a listen to first track “How to Love You Today”, you will absolutely melt. Admitting that he’s learning from the start is the most incredible way to stir up empathy, and even without the conscientious and gorgeous lyrics he provides, the listener is immediately enthralled by his vocals.

And if you think all of the beauty lies in that first track, you’re in for a true treat. The album in its entirety is a soothing, entrancing work of art, riddled with self realizations and honest, heartfelt emotions. Tracks like “Who Could Ask For More?” and “I Am Not An Island” are thrown in with slightly more twang than the rest, as tracks like “Parade” and “I Love You More” infuse more of a soulful, robust sound into the equation.

We could go on at length about this album, but are truly so enveloped in the reality of it that we just think it’s pertinent for you – for anyone – to hear it. We want you to experience the magic that flows from this work, and to enlighten us with your thoughts on it as well! Take a listen below when you’re ready to slow things down a bit.

Keep up with Son of Cloud here.

doubleVee, songs for birds and bats

doubleVee, songs for birds and bats

On Friday, singer/songwriter duo doubleVee – comprised of Allan & Barb Vest – released a new 5-track EP, titled Songs for Birds and Bats. From the initial lines of first track “Map the Channels” – which establishes the energy of the release – through the even more fast paced and staccato-driven “Ladder for the People”, you get the gist that this musical act just does not quit. “Goldstar Redux” begins very layered, and then simplifies as it builds up the vocals.

If you haven’t had the pleasure of witnessing doubleVee until now, you get a sense by that third track that they could create music together in their sleep. The theatrical soundscape alone of “Goldstar Redux” brings you into an invigorating space, driven by the couples’ chemistry, going strong musically since 2012. “Goldstar Redux” explodes into a cacophony of sound before layering into “Landlord of the Flies”, a title which is another nod to “gold” — however, this time it’s more Golding than anything. The duo artfully completes the EP with “Last Castaways”, a twinkling and optimistic soundscape that will keep us reeling this spring.

Keep up with doubleVee here.