deathbeat at pianos

deathbeat at pianos

Deathbeat owned the stage and the crowds attention last night at Pianos. The band hails from Melbourne Australia, they played with power and enthusiasm despite the foreign arctic blast engulfing the city for much of their time here. They kicked off with “Dust The Book” a song which hinges on a hypnotic rhythm from drummer Steve Tyssen. The drum trance coupled with the hazy but precise guitar from Julian Schweitzer foreshadowed the rest of the set. Track after track the duo powered through with distorted guitar and booming percussion.

The fourth track in “Vibe Police” seemed like a tongue in cheek statement about youth and authority. Julian’s presentation of lyrics let the listener know to swallow with a grain of salt. The group next played “Heartbreaks”. This track is reminiscent of “Sabotage” era Beastie Boys. “Heartbreaks” has an accompanying video you can watch with the link below.

The band finished the set with “ZAP 5”. The song has giant Tom Morello – esque guitars that provided emotional closure on a carefully placed and muscular set list. The band will head back home to Australia next week you can keep up with them on social media via the links below.

INSTAGRAM – deathbeatband
irontom at arvest bank theatre at the midland

irontom at arvest bank theatre at the midland

On December 14th, IronTom played as part of the fun lineup for The Night The Buzz Stole XXMas. Having experienced their pension for live performance this past summer, we weren’t surprised by their ability to get the audience to go wild. But we were slightly perturbed by how difficult it was to capture them, since they never stop moving.

 

james blake @ immanuel baptist church {review}

james blake @ immanuel baptist church {review}

On Sunday, at Immanuel Baptist Church in Los Angeles, hundreds gathered to witness the incomparable James Blake.

When he got to the stage, he was humble, and friendly—even his attire was casual (a red and white soccer jersey). His demeanor was reminiscent of a friend that was asking you to listen to their new music as you both sat casually in a makeshift studio.

Once he began to play, it was clear that James Blake performing in a place of worship was all too perfect. The crowd became deafeningly silent, and like a tsunami, Blake was still and suddenly commanding, prominent—like a pastor in the middle of a passionate sermon. Heads bowed and swayed in sync, as if in trance.

His set list included the beloved, “Limit to Your Love,” “Retrograde,” and “Love Me In Whatever Way,”  “Wilhelm Scream,” and other ethereal tracks.  A new song he gifted the audience with was “Asking for a Friend.”

By the end of the show, it was clear that while it wasn’t his intention, Blake became the leader of a new religion: a group of people mesmerized by his (incomparable) vocal abilities, modesty and genuine connectivity.

If you get the opportunity, it would serve you well to see James Blake live in concert, it may not save your soul, but you can feel like it for a couple of hours.  

Keep up with James Blake here.