lightfoils, chambers

lightfoils, chambers

Chicago-based shoegaze/pop collective Lightfoils releases new five track EP Chambers today, and we’ve got your first listen below! (Or fourth, or fifth, or twelfth… who’s counting?) The five-piece – comprised of Zeeshan Abbasi (guitar), Jane Zabeth (vocals), Cory Osborne (bass), John Rungger (drums), and Neil Yodnane (guitar) – wastes no time getting into the psych feels with the kaleidoscope intro to first track “The Bitter Over”, which layers into a cacophony of sound that seems to envelope your senses. “Duende” brings the same level of otherworldly vocals to it, a little more depth to the guitar parts than its predecessor. While “This Time Is Up” brings with it a punk garage band instrumental soundscape, we’re still left wondering how Zabeth can reach such insane places with her vocals. But I digress.

“Summer Nights” might, at first, make you feel a little bitter about the warm evenings being long behind us, but it also provides that whirring nostalgic feeling that makes it feel like summer might not ever end. (And it doesn’t have to if you don’t want it to!) Last track “Honeydew” brings with its title the same lust for warmer months, though we know we can relive those nights with this as the backdrop any time we damn well please.

Pick up this EP. It’s well worth it.

Keep up with Lightfoils here.

rebecca blasband, here

rebecca blasband, here

The world has waited since 1997’s RAPT to hear a follow-up from folk singer-songwriter Rebecca Blasband. Having spent some time producing sound design and music for television and film, she clearly has a knack for what works with her audience, a fact evident within the tracks on Here. Rebecca wastes no time, jumping right into gorgeous ballad “Love Is”, getting a little more primal with the percussive instrumentals. The title track seems to slow the pace down a bit, a lot more introspective than its predecessors. While “Walking On Water” is a song you could see yourself singing around a fire with your closest friends, while “Who The Hell is Peter Brown?” might get a little more attention at a karaoke bar. (It’s got an edge to it a crowd can’t deny!)

“Those Happy Days” picks the pace back up of course, quirky and fun in its existence, while “Ghost Song” slows it all down a bit more, getting very real with lines like “Sometimes I think I’m just gonna disappear / Waste away / In thin air.” If you feel a little out of control of your life right now, this track will resonate in its entirety. “Way Of The World” is a slap of reality, while “Gotta Work It Out” reintroduces that edge we fell for earlier. “Target” is soulful, psychedelic and perfection in most situations, though you might want to be careful about playing the beginning of it while driving. “Long Distance Love Affair” rounds it all out in a bittersweet and beautiful way, as mention of a long distance love affair brings a level of melancholy to an already meandering and blues-y song. It’s the perfect end to the album, as it makes us all feel a little detached by the end of it.

Here is available now. Keep up with Rebecca Blasband here.

larkin poe, venom & faith

larkin poe, venom & faith

Everyone’s favorite roots rock n’ roll duo Larkin Poe recently released a 10-track stunner, packed to the brim with badassery paired with subtle delicacy that only these ladies could pull off. Starting with the military-like drum line first track “Sometimes”, Rebecca and Megan Lovell bring every ounce of soul that they can to each and every track. As evidenced in “Bleach Blonde Bottle Blues”, “Honey Honey”, “Mississippi” (ft. Tyler Bryant), and “California King”, as well as what follows, lead vocalist Rebecca makes us swoon with a gorgeous, far-ranging, robust set of vocals, that comes with a bit of smoke here and there that makes us feel like everything about this album is a mystery. (I mean, check out those instrumentals in “California King”!

“Blue Ridge Mountains” is very much a country track, following suit of the other upbeat, “proud of my hometown” tracks that we’ve become partial to over the years. And if you think “Fly Like an Eagle” is going to be a remake of the Steve Miller Band classic (mad respect to Space Jam), you would be incorrect. This track is far more stunning, though you probably wouldn’t find it in a cartoon-riddled movie starring LeBron James anytime soon. (Or will you?) “Ain’t Gonna Cry” is one of those “knock your heart right out of your chest” songs, as it’s highly relatable and such a raw, matter-of-fact anthem. “Hard Time Killing Floor Blues” is far more classic blues than many of its predecessors, with a boot-stompin’ beat you may just find yourself repeating. The ladies round out this album with 10th track “Good and Gone”. Clearly placed for its title, we were curious to see if we thought it actually belonged as the wrapping on this new gift of an album. That answer is yes. It sounds like something you could play at a funeral or celebration of life, with a little of that quintessential Larkin Poe edge oozing out of the edges.

Keep up with Larkin Poe here.

quietwater, quietwater

quietwater, quietwater

California-based duo Quietwater might not be releasing their debut self-titled EP until the 16th, but – not to brag or anything – we’ve got the exclusive streaming premiere. This 4-track stunner is filled to the brim with percussive intensity, gorgeous, full strings, and boasts a mood mysterious, frantic, and calming, somehow, all at once. Admits the duo:”This EP is very dear to my heart and I’m delighted to finally get it out to the world. Stay tuned for more to come.”

So, if you’re jonesing for some new music for your earholes, check out the magic of Quietwater.

Keep up with Quietwater here.

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timber, the family

timber, the family

Birmingham-based duo Timber – comprised of Janet Simpson-Templin and Will Stewart – releases their brand new 8-track full-length today, and we’ve got all the details. A lush, enigmatic soundscape takes you on an interesting journey, twang-tinged and versatile in its existence. “Burying Ground” is very much a literal track, a melancholic beginning that carries through second track “As a Kill”. “Colors” is a bit spooky and intense, while “Downtown” has a true ballad sense to it and seems to play with dissonance instrumentally quite a bit.

“Sunstroke” is lyrically bittersweet, calling to mind a love – or really amazing situation, at the very least – difficult to shake. As a Kansas City native, “Shuttlecock” made my ears perk up, and the song sings of flying through the sky like one of those intricate sport accessories. It occurs in such a pleasant soundscape that we’re feeling like turning it up and going for a drive this weekend. And perhaps “Errant Oblivion” will inspire another side of us, slow dancing in the moonlight as the instrumentals take over our souls as they seem to already have done. Simpson-Templin and Stewart remind us of their brilliance up until the last lines of final track “Move”, a simplified yet freeing track.

If you’re looking for a soundtrack to a relaxing and thoughtful weekend, this is it.

Keep up with Timber here.

daisybones, gold

daisybones, gold

With baited breath we’ve awaited the arrival of indie rock collective Daisybones‘ 10-track album Gold. The Boston quartet has really provided us with the energy shot we’ve been needing, from the very first chords of the title track, through slightly slower – but just as otherworldly rock as its predecessor – “Choke”, and into “Drag”, which slows down exponentially but doesn’t quite drag, if you as us. (We’re full of jokes today.)

Daisybones performs with a hint of 60s British punk woven into lead singer Dillon Bailey’s vocals. This is especially evident in “Bang”, though “Crush” follows suit perfectly. “Beautymark” might be our favorite of the collection, the tempo changes alluring and the crashing cymbals providing a soundscape that we can both veg out AND dance our asses off to. Many fans might like “Daiquiri” for its tropical vibe, providing us an escape from our (now) snowy landscapes.

“Score” is the obvious head-bopper, frantic and staccato in its existence. If you’re looking for a slower rock track to nerd out over, “Heave” is your particular brand of ear candy, though last track “Lemondrop” might sound as such. “Lemondrop” is actually the perfect way to end the album, slowing everything down exponentially and providing an almost rock ballad-like atmosphere that will lord over you for the rest of the day.

And that’s not a bad thing.

Keep up with Daisybones here.