matthew heller, temple moon desire

matthew heller, temple moon desire

If you’re looking for something to add some spice to your autumn flavor (is there really ever enough spice though, really?), look no further than indie musician Matthew Heller‘s new full-length release Temple Moon Desire. This album opens its listeners up to thirteen tracks full of emotion and raw talent. The lyrics are poignant — songs about staying vulnerable and open in a world so full of hate and mystery bring about a necessary reality check –, the songs create a sonic ambiance all their own, and with the last chords come a deep longing for more.

That’s what good music does to you. It reaches into your soul and guts you. Matthew Heller has done this, with an array of tracks that really show off his brilliance as well as his resilience. If only all of us could create such beauty.

Keep up with Matthew Heller here.

marloe., “ruminate”

marloe., “ruminate”

Brisbane-based indie artist MARLOE. is coming in hot with new music, and we emerge from the experience as though spring is on its way. But truly, allow yourself to melt into this premiere. You just might find yourself reminiscing on that gorgeous warm weather love, or perhaps you’re ready to explore your feelings in the autumn months as things quiet down. Whatever the case may be, you’ll find that fresh new feeling of love in “Ruminate”, a silky smooth pop masterpiece, which perfectly captivates its audience, primed for new beginnings.

Keep up with MARLOE. here.

corinne sharlet, “hail mary”

corinne sharlet, “hail mary”

Portland-based musician Corinne Sharlet comes at us today with the release of her new track “Hail Mary”. Haunting and absolutely magnetic, the song a beautiful testament to Sharlet’s abilities as a singer/songwriter. Her alluring vocals are set over beautiful, intricate guitar parts that continually pique your interest throughout the track, as you focus on the intimacy of it all. The ambiance the song creates alone is impeccable, but when you find out the inspiration behind the track, it’s hard to keep your jaw off the ground. Expands Sharlet:

‘Hail Mary’ wouldn’t exist without the Laurelthirst open mic here in Portland and for that reason the Laurelthirst has become a very special place to me. I wrote the song a couple of years ago when I had just started attending the open mic. Every week, they post a new theme to write a song about. One week the theme was ‘Hail Mary’ and so the song came to be. I love that the Laurelthirst open mic provides the weekly themes because I often find that a random word or two can inspire a song without needing to have a preconceived idea for it. Writing songs feels most natural to me that way. When I write I don’t usually have an idea of something I want to write about, I start by just playing and singing and then the words come.

The song is still mysterious to me. ‘Hail Mary’ seemed to come from a different world — a different time and place. As I started writing, I became very emotional. I practically sobbed through the whole song. One of the ideas that stirs me in the song is the need humans have to turn to things that are bigger than ourselves. I was not raised with formal religion and I do not currently participate in formal religion, but I am fascinated by religious and mythological symbolism and how it has infiltrated my psyche. I don’t want to say too much more about what the song is about because many people have interpreted the song in different ways and I love that.

Check out the beauty of “Hail Mary” below, then let us know what you think on Facebook!

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Keep up with Corinne Sharlet here.

jennifer denali, “try”

jennifer denali, “try”

Have you been looking for a song of substance, tired of the surface pop tracks all over the radio right now? Missing those really deep 90s ballads for their lyrical content, and the beautiful way you could sing them instead of actually saying “Sorry” or “I love you?” Jennifer Denali premieres the acoustic version of her track “Try” with us today, and that is the exact vibe we get from this single.

Touting bold, robust vocals, Denali impresses out the gate and holds her own vocally for the entire three minutes and forty seconds. The video finds her singing in front of a microphone, as though she is simply in a recording session. It gives us a glimpse into her live performance tactics, and simplifies the environment we are enjoying it in.

So delve in, enjoy, and leave some comments on Facebook!

Keep up with Jennifer Denali here.

band of silver, “little talks” [of monsters and men]

band of silver, “little talks” [of monsters and men]

Nashville-based pop/rock trio Band of Silver – comprised of siblings Avery, Alex, and Evan Silvernagel – releases the video for their cover of “Little Talks” by Of Monsters and Men today. We’ve got your first look, and it’s a fun one. A gorgeous song in its own right, Band of Silver decided to add a little more rock guitar and an exponential amount of energy to the track, leaving us moving and grooving a little bit more. Shot beautifully and simply in a warehouse setting, this video also delivers a hint of what the band’s live stage presence is like. In fact, it’s that captivating stage presence that led to this video. Expands the collective:

A few months ago, we saw The Sweet Lizzy Project perform “Little Talks” at Bourbon Street. The crowd really lit up when the song started and we thought, “Hey, we have a male and female singer. We could cover this.” The band did a great job, but we wanted to make our rendition different from theirs as well as the original. We thought it would be fun to mess around with signature melody by playing it on keyboard and guitar rather than horns. Every time I hear this song, it brings me back to art class my sophomore year of high school. Our teacher would play music while we worked, and this is one of the songs I remember most distinctly.

Keep up with Band of Silver here.

the lampshades, “forget me not”

the lampshades, “forget me not”

The Lampshades, while facing their final hours together as a band, show no shame in succumbing to the mundane: The group’s latest music video release for single “Forget Me Not” tours through barren pastures, abandoned car lots, and woodland ruins in a battle with complacency and nostalgia.

The track, marked by early 00’s grunge and mid-tempo moodiness, is rife with undulating bass and bleak acceptance. The first few bars of “Forget Me Not” are quick to ignite and churn steadily, as frontman and lead guitarist Jaren Love reflects aloud to no one but the stretch of highway passing in the side view mirror: “It just doesn’t matter / It all keeps moving on”. During the first chorus, quick jump cuts of rusting abandoned cars and pick-up trucks switch in time with drummer Dane Adelman’s punching kick drum. In a wistful drone, Love laments, “So many photographs / I’ll never see them all / Just a bunch of paper / There’s no porcelain doll”.

Imagery of Love ambling solo through the rural landscape under massive open skies deliver a sense that he is the last man on Earth. No irony is spared in a shot where he explores the crumbled ruins of a building ensnared in weeds, the group vocals of the chorus ringing, “Forget me not, I’ll always be around”.

In what is arguably the most pointed scene in the video, Love’s drive down the highway shows the paint-peeled barns and old warehouses strewn in the tall grass as if left by a passing storm. One such structure bears massive white letters, projecting a branding slogan that is cheerless against the beige landscape: “Delivering the American Dream…”. The camera focuses on these words as Love reveals resentment for terrene interactions, singing “[I] adjust the volume on family and friends / Shake a million hands / But have no conversations”.

A tense moment just before the bass solo and guitar break depicts a steep cliff, with Love’s sneakered feet the only visible part of his body. A ladybug flies away from his pant leg where it was resting, begging the question of just how long Love stood contemplating the chasm. The scene switches, the break sweeps in, and Love’s self-reflection is tangible as he wanders a depleted pasture under a setting sun. Sonically and visually, this scene delivers some of the most potent emotionality of “Forget Me Not”.

With this music video, The Lampshades’ attitudes are bleak, but their sincerity palpable. “Forget Me Not” only gains traction as it progresses; the scenes flickering faster and faster between shots of Love wandering the field at twilight, swimming in a murky lake, and meandering on a dock under the intense sun. Bassist Chris Kibler thunders through each chorus, sparks flying at the song’s close, as the climax peaks and fades out. In the last scene, Love descends a flight of stairs into a basement and disappears from view, returned home yet still alone.

Preceding “Forget Me Not”, The Lampshades released 2018 album Astrology. Their discography also features three additional albums, three EPs, and four singles. With the release of this music video, the Pittsburgh trio has announced their disbandment, and we’re sad to see them go.

Stream The Lampshades’ music here.