phantom wave, “billows”

phantom wave, “billows”

Captivating alt duo Phantom Wave released the new music video for their single “Billows” today, and we’ve got the exclusive premiere for your eyes only. Drenched in vivid colors and drastic, psychedelic movement, this visual is a trippy testament to the impact of the audible art that is flooding our consciousness. There is something magical about the way the lyrics dance along the gorgeous, building instrumental composition that – coupled with the abstract visuals – makes this experience feel very personal, and yet somehow universal.

colin & caroline, “you and i both”

colin & caroline, “you and i both”

Rare is it to find a musical duo that totally creates an ambiance all their own with the way their voices blend mellifluously into instrumentals. But let me tell you… duo Colin & Caroline can make a cover song all their own in a way I have never experienced. Luckily enough, these two have a history – they’ve known each other since high school and are now happily married – that informs their melodies, taking you on new, genre-bending adventures with each release.

Today, as part of the gradual release of a slew of incredible cover tracks over the winter months, we have the exclusive premiere of the duo’s new cover. Originally made famous by Jason Mraz, you’ll find yourself enveloped in clouds with this rendition. Try it on for size below!

Previously released Covers include:

“Wrecking Ball” – Greya 
“Don’t Dream It’s Over” – Kristen Schaeffer
“When the Party’s Over” – Carl Anderson
“Holly Jolly Christmas” – Carl Anderson
“Cardigan” – Sophia Angelie

dark side of the light, “moist”

dark side of the light, “moist”

Jewel tones, simple, gorgeous performance visuals that dance along the fine line between simplistic and artful masterpiece. This is how we would describe the new visual for Los Angeles-based alt-indie duo Dark Side of The Light’s (Nik Frost and Grant Conway) momentum-driving single “Moist”. Expands Frost:

First of all, everything for us emanates from beats and rhythm ideas for the most part. The groove is a really important part of what we do. We took two drummers, Grant and a friend and put them into a room together and had them jam to the sick base loop, recording it live with a stereo mic. What we got sounded almost like samba or something which opened up the song to a whole new world. The actual audio at the beginning of the track is us playing live in the rehearsal space. From there I took the drums and started programming them like they would’ve done back in the day when they were using Akai samplers to do this kind of thing.

I kind of chopped the audio up into different parts and as melodies came to me, I filled the lyrics in. It was one of those songs that while it sounds complex, it actually came pretty easily and I think we created one of the best tracks on the record.

The percussion in this particular track is its own brand of cool, incorporating a soulful and somehow almost hardcore feel to it while we melt into painstakingly well-crafted melodies and a trance-like state of free fall.

sarah frick, “i’m on fire”

sarah frick, “i’m on fire”

When Dwight Twilley wrote and released “I’m on Fire” back in 1975, he probably wasn’t expecting it to be covered decades later, complete with a fresh video.  Well, maybe he was!  Who’s to say?  Either way, the cover, featuring vocals from Sarah Frick for Back to Paradise: A Tulsa Tribute to Okie Music, is stunning, and the video is a perfect visual that beautifully highlights the rock n’ roll essence of the track. 

The video itself is a bit like a montage, with some shots showing Frick trying on different outfits before cutting to a scene of her rocking out, drink in hand.  Of course, we also get to see Frick prancing around in the quiet nightlife, still being the rock star she knows she is.  Not only do we get to see the fun nature of the track played out visually, we also get to watch an empowered badass female take on the night in true “empowered woman” fashion.  I can’t think of a better way to pay tribute to Twilley and the music of Oklahoma.

The album is available now.

devil love, “everywhere leads the sound”

devil love, “everywhere leads the sound”

Today, we’ve got the exclusive premiere of Devil Love’s “Everywhere Leads The Sound” alongside its new lyric video. The first track off their upcoming release Broken Things (February 12), it sets the tone for an album rich in meaning and replete with the unique blend of genres the band is known for. “Everywhere Leads The Sound” clearly bends to the ’90s alt-rock scene, with lighter vocals that bring the overall tone of the song to a softer place.

Typically, when you hear a song with heavy drums and a rougher guitar riff, you don’t necessarily consider it a lullaby. But Devil Love is here to prove that theory incorrect. The band’s willingness to be vulnerable while exhibiting strength in sound is a testament to their work as men outside of the band. Explains Peter Buzzelle of the inspiration behind the track:

This song was originally inspired by my very busy first born daughter, who was later diagnosed with ADHD. The song then morphed into a more broad comment on society and the need to take in life with gratitude.

We’re excited to learn more lessons with Devil Love as they continue to tease the upcoming album.

Keep up with Devil Love here.

the ceiling stares, “thank you for the panic”

the ceiling stares, “thank you for the panic”

Stephen Patchan commands all attention with his new single, “Thank You for the Panic”.  

The independently released track arrives under Patchan’s artist name, The Ceiling Stares, and most certainly accomplishes his goal of illustrating the madness that has been 2020.

With a jarring start and an abrupt ending, discomfort is just one of the many sentiments that this song evokes. The piece includes overlapping vocals, pulsating synths and fast-moving brass instrumentation — creating a similar ambience to what we would expect from Alt-J and Moon Hooch coming together for a genius, impromptu recording session. It becomes clear that Patchan has a knack for building tension, as he leads us to a dead stop that no one was expecting. Suddenly, we find ourselves being prompted to, quite literally, “go insane”. 

I don’t know about you, but it’s not too often that I am encouraged to go crazy… Yet, I think Patchan is on the right path with this notion. 

What this song proves is that, from time to time, chaos is good. And if anything, listening to a chaotic song might just make the rest of life seem a little bit less chaotic in comparison. 

In “Thank You for the Panic”, the born and raised Los Angeleno uses his synth rock sound to illustrate the personal and societal angst this year has brought. Patchan takes inspiration from groups such as Wire and Yellow Magic Orchestra, and this track serves as a nod to Golden Age hip hop. 

Patchan’s debut album, Wicked Problem, was released this past August.