local nomad@ imperfect fifth’s year 3 bash

local nomad@ imperfect fifth’s year 3 bash

by: leigha stuiso

Local Nomad took to our virtual stage for A Night w/ One in a Million Media: Imperfect Fifth’s Anniversary. With minor microphone problems and a lot of passion, the performance is what music is all about. With just a guitar in hand and a microphone, there was a feeling like you were at an intimate, acoustic concert. Watching an artist perform takes you out of the moment and transported to a different world, which is what happened here. If you weren’t a fan of Local Nomad yet, you definitely are now. Starting out with “Love is Gone”, off the EP LOCAL NOMAD, it is easy to tell that Mike Desmond loves what he does. Throughout the set, there is a fire behind his voice that ignites the lyrics and brings the songs to life. He plays three more songs, and talks about his decision not to play a Leonard Cohen song. With the help of his friend James, the set was a real success and gives you that feeling you might be missing from seeing live shows. If you have around 20 minutes and missed the original stream, check out Local Nomad’s performance below.

nikki o’neill, “you’re the only one who gets me”

nikki o’neill, “you’re the only one who gets me”

by katy mombourquette

As young Nikki O’Neill grew up in a trilingual household in Sweden, she didn’t fully realize that she was absorbing all of the diverse cultures around her until it popped up into her music. In her upcoming album World is Waiting, O’Neill and her five-piece band explore R&B, gospel, Americana, and blues in tracks led by O’Neill’s natural vocals, inviting guitar playing, and catchy, intentional songwriting. A taste of what’s to come, O’Neill’s music video for the single “You’re the Only One Who Gets Me” is a witty and untroubled depiction of an oft-misinterpreted introvert who has finally found a kindred spirit. She characterizes it by saying “This song is meant to have some sense of humor… it’s about this introspective person who’s constantly been miscast and misunderstood by others. It’s pretty exhausting to never feel comfortable around people, so when you finally meet someone who gets you and who you can be yourself with, it’s like you hit the jackpot.”

In the video, O’Neill is bathed in the white light of the beach, standing with and without her guitar on the sand, in front of walls, and on wooden steps, singing sincerely to the camera. A hint of jazz in the guitar and bass brings the blues, and O’Neill’s voice brings some country flair to the SoCal americana groove. Overall, though, the track is quite calm. The vocals and harmonies aren’t particularly loud or in-your-face, rather they are soft sounds that just diffuse delectably with each other and the other instruments. At the same time, O’Neill’s eyes, as they stare into the camera, reveal her conviction. They are so expressive and honest, you find yourself watching them more than anything else. Every aspect of the music video works well together, from the slow-motion shots and the easy rock sound to O’Neill’s passionate eyes and how they augment the meaningful lyrics. Reveals O’Neill of the track:

This song is meant to have some sense of humor… it’s about this introspective person who’s constantly been miscast and misunderstood by others. It’s pretty exhausting to never feel comfortable around people, so when you finally meet someone who gets you and who you can be yourself with, it’s like you hit the jackpot.

Whether you’re an introvert yourself or not, hearing a song about finding someone who truly gets you is always refreshing, and O’Neill captures this feeling in a peaceful yet groovy 4-minute package with visuals that calm your nerves and make you feel known. 

Pre-oder World is Waiting here.

stephen clair, “fixing to fly”

stephen clair, “fixing to fly”

by: katy mombourquette

If this were a Friends episode, it would be called “The One With A Chicken.” Stephen Clair’s upcoming single “Fixing to Fly” features strangely cute chicken-related metaphors to describe the complications of romance, supplemented by rustic visuals of a chicken coop in the accompanying video.

Clair is known for his intent singing and literary songwriting, something he channels in the lyrics to “Fixing to Fly” which have a certain poetry to them. But his songs aren’t wispy folk tunes that one often associates with lyrical storytelling, rather they are garage Americana tunes with classic, bluesy sounding guitar, crashing cymbals, and driven walking bass lines. The first few moments of “Fixing to Fly” reveal the song’s whole nature immediately, with the swinging guitar that meanders about on its own for a while before the bass comes in to ground it in the twangy Americana sound. Clair’s voice rings out clear and genuine, like a humble offering to his listeners, subtly asking them to follow along as he sings: “Cooped up in this roost with all these chicks / And the henhouse ain’t a funhouse / When you’re fixing to fly but your wings don’t get you high.” 

If you’re feeling down and just can’t find the right way to express how you feel, give “Fixing to Fly” a shot. The odd metaphors that lie within a chicken’s wings may speak to your soul in ways you have never known before. 

THE SMALL HOURS is out via Rock City Records Sept 18th

photo by: tony cenicola

whiterosemoxie, “west side boys”

whiterosemoxie, “west side boys”

by: leigha stuiso

Up-and-coming hip hop artist whiterosemoxie debuted the music video for “west side boys” ahead of the release of his next mixtape. The video premiered on Pigeons & Planes’ YouTube channel and was shot, directed and edited by Jax Anderson. whiterosemoxie and his friends star in the video which is similar to a day-in-the-life of the Detroit native. The track comes off his debut full-length release, white ceilings, and is a reminder that the people around you have to be your foundation, especially in darker times. This idea will come to fruition in his next mixtape, grae ceilings. Although he just finished high school, his lyrics are vulnerable and introspective, which you might not expect from someone his age. After a near-death experience, whiterosemoxie decided to start making music alone in his basement. Now, he is moving up and beginning to collaborate on the song making process with others. There is a slight feeling of anticipation at the beginning of the song, not knowing where the beat is going to go until the drums kick in. The down-tempo track exemplifies his artistry and only adds another layer to his musical identity. Check out “west side boys” and the new music video out now. 

tyrone’s jacket, “streets”

tyrone’s jacket, “streets”

by: katy mombourquette

Tyrone’s Jacket has dominated the live performance scene with their dynamic shows that boast high musical/visual production value and energetic acts that have earned them spots on three national tours and multiple music festivals, including a national tour with Dirty Heads. Their satisfied audiences have hyped the band up to almost mythic proportions since so little of their recorded material has been available– until now. Their newly released single, “Streets”, is an emotional musical and visual narrative that chronicles the homeless epidemic in LA. It’s a deeply emotional and revelatory alt-pop ballad with a soulful vibe that’s driven by frontman and vocalist KnowaKing (son of the Commodores co-founder, William Wak King). While the band consists of KnowaKing (lead vocals), The Grateful Carl (vocals and guitar), and Ry Toast (DJ), the two-time Grammy-nominated producer King David is thought as an extension of the band itself through his faithful work with the band since their inception. His skilled, and gentle but prominent production knows exactly when to lift up the vocals, and when to strip things back to let the powerful lyrics stand on their own. KnowaKing’s vocals dance with the line between raspy and smooth, simultaneously pleasing the ears and allowing them to engage with the song’s message. The subject of homelessness in combination with the real-world images in the music video and the anthemic beat create a powerful environment that invites the listener to sing along, but more importantly, pay attention to what the band is trying to say. 
About the track, “Streets is a love song in every sense of the word,” explains vocalist KnowaKing. “Spawned from a broken heart while congregating with derelicts, the pursuit and ultimate discovery of self unknowingly was my destiny. In a city the size of a small country, we become desensitized to the downtrodden because they reflect our greatest fear. But they have a story, they have ideas, they have dignity and they deserve attention.”

“Streets” proves that Tyrone’s Jacket is just as captivating in the studio as they are on stage. The band’s debut self-titled album will be out in November, with more new music following on the heels of “Streets.”

you were my september song | september 2020

you were my september song | september 2020

Listen. Music is great and all that, but we are between seasons on a ton of our favorite shows, other key series are being pushed for COVID-safe filming, and big companies can’t decide if they are going to release their new blockbusters to theaters or directly to streaming.

All this to say, we’re lacking unique visual stimulation. (Or, at least the kind that doesn’t entirely turn your brain to mush.) So, let’s keep ourselves entertained – and educated – a bit more and hang out with some awesome new videos released this month!

New videos added regularly until October, so check back for more!