band of silver, “little talks” [of monsters and men]

band of silver, “little talks” [of monsters and men]

Nashville-based pop/rock trio Band of Silver – comprised of siblings Avery, Alex, and Evan Silvernagel – releases the video for their cover of “Little Talks” by Of Monsters and Men today. We’ve got your first look, and it’s a fun one. A gorgeous song in its own right, Band of Silver decided to add a little more rock guitar and an exponential amount of energy to the track, leaving us moving and grooving a little bit more. Shot beautifully and simply in a warehouse setting, this video also delivers a hint of what the band’s live stage presence is like. In fact, it’s that captivating stage presence that led to this video. Expands the collective:

A few months ago, we saw The Sweet Lizzy Project perform “Little Talks” at Bourbon Street. The crowd really lit up when the song started and we thought, “Hey, we have a male and female singer. We could cover this.” The band did a great job, but we wanted to make our rendition different from theirs as well as the original. We thought it would be fun to mess around with signature melody by playing it on keyboard and guitar rather than horns. Every time I hear this song, it brings me back to art class my sophomore year of high school. Our teacher would play music while we worked, and this is one of the songs I remember most distinctly.

Keep up with Band of Silver here.

the lampshades, “forget me not”

the lampshades, “forget me not”

The Lampshades, while facing their final hours together as a band, show no shame in succumbing to the mundane: The group’s latest music video release for single “Forget Me Not” tours through barren pastures, abandoned car lots, and woodland ruins in a battle with complacency and nostalgia.

The track, marked by early 00’s grunge and mid-tempo moodiness, is rife with undulating bass and bleak acceptance. The first few bars of “Forget Me Not” are quick to ignite and churn steadily, as frontman and lead guitarist Jaren Love reflects aloud to no one but the stretch of highway passing in the side view mirror: “It just doesn’t matter / It all keeps moving on”. During the first chorus, quick jump cuts of rusting abandoned cars and pick-up trucks switch in time with drummer Dane Adelman’s punching kick drum. In a wistful drone, Love laments, “So many photographs / I’ll never see them all / Just a bunch of paper / There’s no porcelain doll”.

Imagery of Love ambling solo through the rural landscape under massive open skies deliver a sense that he is the last man on Earth. No irony is spared in a shot where he explores the crumbled ruins of a building ensnared in weeds, the group vocals of the chorus ringing, “Forget me not, I’ll always be around”.

In what is arguably the most pointed scene in the video, Love’s drive down the highway shows the paint-peeled barns and old warehouses strewn in the tall grass as if left by a passing storm. One such structure bears massive white letters, projecting a branding slogan that is cheerless against the beige landscape: “Delivering the American Dream…”. The camera focuses on these words as Love reveals resentment for terrene interactions, singing “[I] adjust the volume on family and friends / Shake a million hands / But have no conversations”.

A tense moment just before the bass solo and guitar break depicts a steep cliff, with Love’s sneakered feet the only visible part of his body. A ladybug flies away from his pant leg where it was resting, begging the question of just how long Love stood contemplating the chasm. The scene switches, the break sweeps in, and Love’s self-reflection is tangible as he wanders a depleted pasture under a setting sun. Sonically and visually, this scene delivers some of the most potent emotionality of “Forget Me Not”.

With this music video, The Lampshades’ attitudes are bleak, but their sincerity palpable. “Forget Me Not” only gains traction as it progresses; the scenes flickering faster and faster between shots of Love wandering the field at twilight, swimming in a murky lake, and meandering on a dock under the intense sun. Bassist Chris Kibler thunders through each chorus, sparks flying at the song’s close, as the climax peaks and fades out. In the last scene, Love descends a flight of stairs into a basement and disappears from view, returned home yet still alone.

Preceding “Forget Me Not”, The Lampshades released 2018 album Astrology. Their discography also features three additional albums, three EPs, and four singles. With the release of this music video, the Pittsburgh trio has announced their disbandment, and we’re sad to see them go.

Stream The Lampshades’ music here.

most captivating new music videos of august 2019

most captivating new music videos of august 2019

August has been a beautiful, hot, wonderful month and we are so grateful to have so much new art available to us! We continue our monthly installment of the visual soundtrack, a Youtube playlist of new music videos that we love! Most – if not all – of these videos were released this month, so if you’re looking for new releases, this is your most up-to-date list. Check it out daily for the rest of the month for new additions, and come back anytime to relive August 2019!

nicholas altobelli, “tell me what i got to do”

nicholas altobelli, “tell me what i got to do”

Today, indie pop musician Nicholas Altobelli releases the music video for his track “Tell Me What I Got To Do”. A leisurely pace and a sincere host of lyrics give this song impact, as Altobelli lays vulnerable his desires. The video is interestingly shot, with warmth applied as if you’re viewing the world with rose colored glasses. But the subject matter is much more melancholy, matching the pace and composition of the track.

Get your first peep below, and let us know what you think on Facebook!

Vertigo was released August 2. Keep up with Nicholas Altobelli here.

starbird & the phoenix, “sunbeam”

starbird & the phoenix, “sunbeam”

Folk-pop duo Starbird & the Phoenix – made up of Courtney Bassett and Andrew Swackhamer – are back with a groovy acoustic rendition of the hit song, “Sunbeam”. Producing a video full of summery feel-good vibes, the two are jamming out in a quaint space allowing the viewer to feel as if they’re right in the studio with the artists. Between Andrew shredding on the ukulele and Courtney hitting astronomically high notes, you can’t do anything but “groove along with me” as the lyrics suggest. Great for a pick me up, one watch through the video will have your soul feeding off the energy of the two in no time. Be sure to catch this wonderful remake of “Sunbeam” the week of August 12 and allow yourself to dive into the world of Starbird and the Phoenix.

Keep up with the band here.

the late innings, “our secret”

the late innings, “our secret”

Fullerton-based indie rock musician The Late Innings (Vincent Sinex) is coming at us hard with the video premiere for his track “Our Secret”. The song itself takes almost a spoken word tempo, packed with entertaining lyrics. As we get an audible glimpse into simpler times in the bay area, we are drawn to the adventurous nature of topographically-designed lyrics.

Explains Vincent:

I made the ‘Our Secret’ video entirely using topographical maps. I wanted to capture the restless feeling of a traveler going from one place after another, searching for that perfect spot. I’ve always been fascinated by maps and travel. When I was younger, I would spend many hours poring over atlases and maps, studying place names and doing things like learning state capitals. To make the video, I took screen captures from United States Geological Survey topographical maps and used them to illustrate not only the lyrics of the song, but also the types of places (beaches, coves and bays) the traveler encounters in the song.

This song itself is about a guy who travels to a place he considers his ‘secret’ vacation spot, only to find out that the place is now overrun with tourists. He’s disappointed to discover that something he used to think of ‘his’ is now a place that apparently everybody now knows about. The inspiration for this song came from a trip of my own, where we went to a beach that seemingly no one knew about, and we had the whole place to ourselves that afternoon. After that trip, I thought, ‘The next time I want to go back there, will it still be a secret, especially since in the age of social media, nothing is a secret anymore?

Nothing is a secret, and we can all relate. Check out the video below!

Keep up with The Late Innings at thelateinnings.com.