vanwyck, molten rock

vanwyck, molten rock

Breezy, ethereal vocals. Light as a feather instrumentals, a warm and inviting soundscape. All of these factors are involved in VanWyck‘s newest full-length release, out today. The project, titled Molten Rock, is comprised of twelve impossibly beautiful tracks, inspired — in part, at least — undoubtedly by the folk of yesteryear. A slow, steady pace is established with first track “Supermarket Line”, and continues into “Lead Me On”, while “Rock Carver” brings with it more assertive instrumentals and a raspier take on the vocals.

“Make of Me” slows everything down to a crawl, gorgeous and sprawling in its soundscape. It is here that we take pause, to realize how important it is to note the comparisons to Leonard Cohen and Nathalie Merchant that VanWyck’s debut album drew, and to notice the way the music has evolved in the space and time since that album was released in 2018. As we roll into “Carolina’s Anatomy”, we feel an attraction to a new love the way this song seems to convey.

Have you ever been this close to feeling no remorse
and being where you want to be

“High School Gym Wall” is even more delicate than its predecessors, something we never would have guessed by its title. Haunting in a way that impresses, it perfectly introduces “Be It to the End”, which brings with it a darker, more theatric atmosphere. “Breakfast Room Revelation” is layered, a ballad of sorts that holds as one of our favorites from this collection.

“The Boatman Calls” and “Like an Ambush” are both solidly beautiful tracks, leading into “The Rock Steady Creeper” which is also impossibly relaxing in its disposition, despite the title. VanWyck expertly rounds out the album with twelfth and final track, the title track, which has the sonic feel of witnessing molten rock cascade down a landscape. The lyrics are descriptive, painting an intense picture, comparisons we all have the capacity to feel.

This album, if nothing else, urges you to feel. Whether by its intense and relatable lyrical content, or its lavish soundscapes. Experience it in full below, and let us know how you feel on Facebook!

Keep up with VanWyck here.

imperfect Fifth + do good co. | year 2 bash

imperfect Fifth + do good co. | year 2 bash

The end of October brought with it more than just a weather cool-down. As we started to bundle up for the winter ahead, we took time to pause on a breezy Autumn evening to celebrate the last 2 years of accomplishments with Imperfect Fifth. We were lucky enough to partner with Do Good Co., an incredible company on 38th Street in Kansas City, MO, who was also celebrating their 2nd birthday that evening. Together, we brought in vendors (Sugar Buffet KC, Scorpio Rising Botanicals, Crystal Ramirez Jewelry) and unique shopping opportunities with an evening of music and fun. Guitarist James Schneider opened the evening, followed by the talents of Danza Special and Fathers. We captured some photographs, caught up with friends, and were able to celebrate some incredible people locally, to boost our change globally.

Check our merch shop all week for discounts! Sales end at midnight, 11.11!

**photos by Erin P.S. Zimmerman, Elizabeth Schneider, and Meredith Schneider

christine smith, meet me on the far side of a star

christine smith, meet me on the far side of a star

Christine Smith is a songstress capable of bringing both a hint of gothic-inspired sounds and inspired lyrics. Her new 9-track release Meet Me on The Far Side of a Star is no different, catapulting its listener into a slightly whimsical existence. Starting out slow and steady, an absolute ambiance is created with “This Love”. The piano leads the way into “You Can’t Hurt Me Anymore”, and an ear that has never witnessed Smith’s music can sense a very theatrical disposition almost off the bat. And perhaps that’s the magic about Meet Me on The Far Side of a Star, as it feels as though all of these songs could be written into a stage performance. Both “Trying Not to Fall in Love” and “Happily Never After” could both be read as tongue in cheek, though the genuine attempt to avoid love is a real thing that many people grapple with.

“Feels Like Yesterday” brings the nostalgia in like a train at high speed, while the title track brings the tempo up slightly more than its predecessors. “I Know This Moon” feels like a lullaby, and wonderful caress compared to the other tracks that are part of this collection. It might appeal to the increasing number of people who are starting to follow moon cycles a little more closely, and become something almost sacred for some. “Very, Very” feels just as delicate, while “We’re Never Going” is the perfect final track, as there is a sense of finality not only in its title, but also in the structure of the instrumentals.

How wonderful to feel like this audible journey closes out as perfectly as it could. Enjoy the album in its entirety below, and be sure to let us know how you’re feeling about it on Facebook!