boy in space + unheard, “cold”

boy in space + unheard, “cold”

Set to release on August 8, “Cold” by Boy in Space is a great new R&B track that packs a mighty punch in the depth of its lyrics. With opening sounds reminiscent of a lullaby, this song will launch you deep into your feelings, “Both you and me no we gotta let it go/ Laying on the ground wondering why it’s so cold”. Deeply questioning the problems in a relationship, there is something we can all relate to with this track. 

For fans of Fletcher, SHY Martin, or Chelsea Cutler there is a lot to look forward to here with Boy in Space. His R&B meets pop culture sound will have him on the up and up for many years to come, so be sure to keep up with him here.

james delaney, “live it up”

james delaney, “live it up”

“Live It Up”, the newest single from LA up-and-comer James Delaney, opens to the playful bounce of a video-game bop and a twinkling tropicality – but don’t let that fool you. A closer listen reveals an ennui that borders on ironic.

To clue you in, the very first lyrics paint a picture of a certain brand of indulgence that feels very 2019: “We’ve been wasting time getting high and watching shitty tv shows / Feeling comatose in our dirty clothes.” Split right down the middle, the lyrical content of “Live It Up” resorts to indulgence and lethargy to escape life stress; while sonically, it’s neutrally cheery – a notion that is paralleled in the song’s structure, as the verses bear the weight of Delaney’s approach. Radiating synth and an unchanging mellow tempo meet Delaney’s clear-cut chorus, ringing with a might-as-well attitude: “Live it up, live it up, live it up.” The last few bars close out on a sax solo, whose hum suggests that Delaney is already off to follow his own advice.

Keep up with James Delaney here.

chiiild, “count me out”

chiiild, “count me out”

Montreal born Chiiild has recently dropped an idyllic hit single in “Count Me Out”, with hazy vocalism gently pressed over the top of true R&B beats creating delicious soul food for the ears. Picture Tame Impala teaming up with D’Angelo for this celestial sound that crosses genres from the classical beginning to the jazzy blues ending. If the sound itself isn’t enough to draw you in then the lyrics will by promoting feelings of self-love with the insistence that you can bounce back from anything. The chorus, “Don’t count me out because I’ll come back” will get your head slow nodding along to the beat within the first thirty seconds. 

Chiiild will also be heading overseas towards the end of this year but has promised more music for Fall of 2019. One thing is for certain though this is definitely an artist to keep your eye on moving into the future.

9/14 — Vancouver, BC — Vogue Theatre
9/15 — Seattle, WA — The Crocodile
9/17 — Portland, OR — Hawthorne Theatre
9/19 — San Francisco, CA — The Regency Ballroom
9/21 — Los Angeles, CA — Fonda Theatre
9/24 — Houston, TX — The Studio at Warehouse Live
9/25 — Dallas, TX — Trees
9/27 — Atlanta, GA — The Loft
9/30 — New York, NY — Brooklyn Steel
10/1 — Philadelphia, PA — Theatre of Living Arts
10/2 — Toronto, ON — Phoenix Concert Theatre
10/4 — Detroit, MI — Magic Stick
10/5 — Chicago, IL — Metro
10/7 — Boulder, CO — Fox Theatre
10/9 — Salt Lake City, UT — Metro Music Hall
10/11 — Santa Ana, CA — Yost Theater

Keep up with Chiiild here.

garçons, “froggin'”

garçons, “froggin'”

Its power lying in consistency, the unstoppable groove pulsating from Garçons’ “Froggin” is immediately infectious.  The track expertly weaves influences of Afrobeat, R&B, and hip-hop to churn out a jam that resonates deep.

This track bares a party-ready confidence, marked by incisive marimba, dangling cowbell, and a beat like the fuzz of a blown out speaker. Vocalist Deelo Avery’s vocals strategically shift in and out of the forefront of the mix, blending a satisfying crescendo, as the vibrating bass is met by the contrast of tight claps. Garçons have meshed these elements to pump out an instant head-nodder that remains breezily versatile – “Froggin” is equally effective in capturing a solitary focus or entrancing a crowded dance floor.

While “Froggin” finds freshness in an emphasis on dance beats, this track comfortably parallels the R&B leaning of Garçons’ previous work. The last release from the Ottawa duo, comprised of vocalist Deelo Avery and producer Julian Strangelove, was 2018’s Body Language. If the next work they put out is anything like “Froggin”, we’re totally on board.

Follow Garçons on social media here:
https://twitter.com/realgarcons
https://soundcloud.com/realgarcons
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi-LyhMsvpYq_rqZrBr1nkw/videos
https://www.instagram.com/realgarcons/

corey harper, barely put together

corey harper, barely put together

Corey Harper’s newest EP Barely Put Together hones in on young adulthood, deftly blending moods colored with snug optimism, taut despondence, and wistful recollection. The five-track EP exhibits Harper’s talent for constructing songs that deliver the immediacy of a live performance; some with the resounding power of a stadium anthem, and others, the gentle intimacy of an acoustic set.
Opening track “Blind” is warm, woody, and feels hopeful despite the fretting lyrics, dealing with the questionable aspects of an unstable relationship. Minute details produce an endearing familiarity, as well as contribute to the feel of a live performance: A close listen reveals the clicks and scratches of Harper’s fingers along the acoustic as he plays, and the generous reverb on his vocals ghost behind as if echoing across a stadium.
Moody, syncopated chords on second song “Don’t Hate Me” are reminiscent of the biggest hits of Justin Bieber and Shawn Mendes, as Harper evokes vulnerability following a tenuous relationship. He begs his significant other for a diplomatic split: “If we’re breaking up, we’re breaking up, just don’t hate me / That’s the only thing I couldn’t live with, baby”. A resounding anthemic club beat punctuates the severity of the chorus here, emphasizing the lyrics’ unabashed heartache. After the first chorus, a hidden gem in the form of a bluesy electric riff sneaks by, a segue to Harper’s bare vocals bolstered by a deeply funky bass line. His mercury-smooth vocal runs contribute the perfect dash of R&B freshness.  Of all the tracks on the EP, this song welcomes the widest range of elements spanning several genres.
What follows exhibits confidence, defiance, and acceptance that life doesn’t always make perfect sense. Track 3 from Barely Put Together is titled “Better”, and carries the easy-breezy swagger of a California boulevard, as the chorus declares: “I like it better knowing I don’t have it all together.” Harper’s soaring falsetto complements the peppered lead guitar riff, giving listeners plenty of sunny texture to look forward to.
Track “Dried Blood” is a dip in atmosphere and stripped down in comparison, the acoustic picking pensive and cautious. This song’s lyrical melody is beautifully melancholy, but the strumming patterns are never dark; offering a versatile intimacy that could flourish within the walls of a solitary bedroom or floating alongside a each breeze. Harper faces the difficulties of healing from past failures, and casts out his doubts about the future in a fluttering falsetto: “Waiting for the waves to crash, [I’m] too far out to make it back.” Comparable to the scratching guitar strings from “Blind” is the slightest rustling noise in the background during the verses of “Dried Blood” – it suggests Harper is shifting positions in his seat as he plays. These “imperfections” cast a spell that is enthralling because it is realistic, as listeners are able to visualize Harper playing the music live.
Harper is at his most raw and desperate for the final track of Barely Put Together: “Best of Me” is an anthem best characterized by its rising anticipation and stadium earnestness. The first chorus offers a head-turning twist, as the muted beat and strumming actually shift to the back of the mix, granting Harper an open stage allow his vocal presence to take precedence. Electronica-style vocals layer behind the clear belting and gripping rasp, weaving a crowd of voices that proclaim Harper’s drift from heartache: “You’ll never get the best of me.”

Tracklisting 
01. Blind
02. Don’t Hate Me
03. Better
04. Dried Blood
05. Best of Me
Follow Corey Harper here:
fallow land, slow down, rockstar

fallow land, slow down, rockstar

Ann Arbor based indie rock band Fallow Land has recently released their first LP Slow Down, Rockstar dripping with hefty arpeggios flush with reverb and repetition while emotional lyrics slide over the top. A true evolution for the band from their EP Pinscher guitarist/vocalist Whit Fineberg claims a lot of emotional healing in the two years between records. He was even quoted to say, “When I was younger I lived more recklessly, it sometimes felt like every aspect of my life was an extension of the art I was creating.” While this was helpful in creating the band’s early works a fundamental shift was necessary for further production and as they’ve matured emotionally listeners can hear a change between the two albums. 

With “The Things You Say” and “The Hope” emerging as the two most popular songs it’s by no coincidence that they’re also two of the most emotional and healing songs on the album. “The Things You Say” offers a total expression of fears and emotional exposure from the band. While in “The Hope” listeners are able to come to a place of complete comfort, similarly to how Fineberg himself was able to find comfort in the relationship he was writing about. With an emotion for everyone expressed on the album, the most unique song is “The Dog Song” featuring a heavy metal vibe unlike anything else on the record, and at third to last it creates a nice change of pace to reinforce the attention of the listener. As the band figured out who and what they wanted to be throughout the course of the work anyone listening in is also able to follow the narrative arc from beginning to end. 

Perhaps though one of the most unique features of the album is how every track’s title begins with “The” instantly piquing the interest of anyone reading through the songs. This repetition of “The” also reflects the repetitive nature of a few of the tracks on the album such as “The Boredom” discussing gym class days and a need to feel comfortable in your own skin again. This album contains lyrical warmth felt inside of your bones while also packing a powerful punch from the content of the words being said. 

Slow Down, Rockstar is a perfectly complete album with a definitive style created and maintained throughout its entirety. With lines such as, “I was unaware of the space your presence occupied inside of me” and “I wish I could undress your influence” it’s no wonder anyone who sits through the whole thing will feel as if they just traveled along an emotional roller coaster, and came out better because of it.

Fallow Land will be announcing their 2019 tour of the USA soon, so be sure to check out their new LP Slow Down, Rockstar here and stay up to date on their tour here.