larkin poe, venom & faith

larkin poe, venom & faith

Everyone’s favorite roots rock n’ roll duo Larkin Poe recently released a 10-track stunner, packed to the brim with badassery paired with subtle delicacy that only these ladies could pull off. Starting with the military-like drum line first track “Sometimes”, Rebecca and Megan Lovell bring every ounce of soul that they can to each and every track. As evidenced in “Bleach Blonde Bottle Blues”, “Honey Honey”, “Mississippi” (ft. Tyler Bryant), and “California King”, as well as what follows, lead vocalist Rebecca makes us swoon with a gorgeous, far-ranging, robust set of vocals, that comes with a bit of smoke here and there that makes us feel like everything about this album is a mystery. (I mean, check out those instrumentals in “California King”!

“Blue Ridge Mountains” is very much a country track, following suit of the other upbeat, “proud of my hometown” tracks that we’ve become partial to over the years. And if you think “Fly Like an Eagle” is going to be a remake of the Steve Miller Band classic (mad respect to Space Jam), you would be incorrect. This track is far more stunning, though you probably wouldn’t find it in a cartoon-riddled movie starring LeBron James anytime soon. (Or will you?) “Ain’t Gonna Cry” is one of those “knock your heart right out of your chest” songs, as it’s highly relatable and such a raw, matter-of-fact anthem. “Hard Time Killing Floor Blues” is far more classic blues than many of its predecessors, with a boot-stompin’ beat you may just find yourself repeating. The ladies round out this album with 10th track “Good and Gone”. Clearly placed for its title, we were curious to see if we thought it actually belonged as the wrapping on this new gift of an album. That answer is yes. It sounds like something you could play at a funeral or celebration of life, with a little of that quintessential Larkin Poe edge oozing out of the edges.

Keep up with Larkin Poe here.

quietwater, quietwater

quietwater, quietwater

California-based duo Quietwater might not be releasing their debut self-titled EP until the 16th, but – not to brag or anything – we’ve got the exclusive streaming premiere. This 4-track stunner is filled to the brim with percussive intensity, gorgeous, full strings, and boasts a mood mysterious, frantic, and calming, somehow, all at once. Admits the duo:”This EP is very dear to my heart and I’m delighted to finally get it out to the world. Stay tuned for more to come.”

So, if you’re jonesing for some new music for your earholes, check out the magic of Quietwater.

Keep up with Quietwater here.

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timber, the family

timber, the family

Birmingham-based duo Timber – comprised of Janet Simpson-Templin and Will Stewart – releases their brand new 8-track full-length today, and we’ve got all the details. A lush, enigmatic soundscape takes you on an interesting journey, twang-tinged and versatile in its existence. “Burying Ground” is very much a literal track, a melancholic beginning that carries through second track “As a Kill”. “Colors” is a bit spooky and intense, while “Downtown” has a true ballad sense to it and seems to play with dissonance instrumentally quite a bit.

“Sunstroke” is lyrically bittersweet, calling to mind a love – or really amazing situation, at the very least – difficult to shake. As a Kansas City native, “Shuttlecock” made my ears perk up, and the song sings of flying through the sky like one of those intricate sport accessories. It occurs in such a pleasant soundscape that we’re feeling like turning it up and going for a drive this weekend. And perhaps “Errant Oblivion” will inspire another side of us, slow dancing in the moonlight as the instrumentals take over our souls as they seem to already have done. Simpson-Templin and Stewart remind us of their brilliance up until the last lines of final track “Move”, a simplified yet freeing track.

If you’re looking for a soundtrack to a relaxing and thoughtful weekend, this is it.

Keep up with Timber here.

daisybones, gold

daisybones, gold

With baited breath we’ve awaited the arrival of indie rock collective Daisybones‘ 10-track album Gold. The Boston quartet has really provided us with the energy shot we’ve been needing, from the very first chords of the title track, through slightly slower – but just as otherworldly rock as its predecessor – “Choke”, and into “Drag”, which slows down exponentially but doesn’t quite drag, if you as us. (We’re full of jokes today.)

Daisybones performs with a hint of 60s British punk woven into lead singer Dillon Bailey’s vocals. This is especially evident in “Bang”, though “Crush” follows suit perfectly. “Beautymark” might be our favorite of the collection, the tempo changes alluring and the crashing cymbals providing a soundscape that we can both veg out AND dance our asses off to. Many fans might like “Daiquiri” for its tropical vibe, providing us an escape from our (now) snowy landscapes.

“Score” is the obvious head-bopper, frantic and staccato in its existence. If you’re looking for a slower rock track to nerd out over, “Heave” is your particular brand of ear candy, though last track “Lemondrop” might sound as such. “Lemondrop” is actually the perfect way to end the album, slowing everything down exponentially and providing an almost rock ballad-like atmosphere that will lord over you for the rest of the day.

And that’s not a bad thing.

Keep up with Daisybones here.

sexy dex and the fresh, don’t play my b-sides

sexy dex and the fresh, don’t play my b-sides

New Orleans-based Sexy Dex and The Fresh – comprised of Dexter Gilmore (Guitar, Vocals), Gabrielle Washington (Vocals), Andrew Landry (Bass), Evan Cvitanovic (Drums), and Ben Buchbinder (Keys) – has been winning awards left and right in the south, and we can see why. As a young band, their technique – and, truly, pure chemistry – is undeniable. Not to mention the alluring genre they’ve almost created unto themselves. You can witness this in their new EP Don’t Play My B-Sides.

Though you’ll hear some psychedelic influence amidst the funk in “SDTF”, hip hop makes its way in there, as well as some interesting pop-infused dance breakdowns. We could see ourselves dancing to “Play Me Birdie” at a sock hop, but there’s an 80’s flare to it as well as a quirky, fast tempo that is a total earworm. “These Young Charms” exists in a more quintessentially 80s soundscape, while “!Wait!” presents a cacophony of sound that is otherworldly in its disposition. Last track “Fotographs” begins with a speaking part that truly captures the otherworldly, as the song blossoms into another 80s-inspired dance track.

Check it out below!

Keep up with Sexy Dex and The Fresh here.

vhs collection, retrofuturism

vhs collection, retrofuturism

New York-based indie pop trio VHS Collection – expertly comprised of long-time friends James Bohannon, Conor Cook, and Nils Vanderlip – released their new 12-track stunner, Retrofuturism, on Friday. With vocals reminiscent of The Kooks, first track “One” explodes into an interesting cacophony of sound effects and percussion that will get your head spinning, yet better prepared for what’s to come. “I Can’t Stand It” deconstructs the album a bit, keeping a good dance pace loaded with a little more attitude, while “Take My Money” makes you feel like you should be donning clothing of yesteryear, putting on your favorite pair of shades in slow motion.

“Sign” modernizes the sound even more, though keeping it glittering and 80s-inspired, magnetic in its disposition. “Blame It On A Dream” bounces into a layered version of what you might hear in a hip hotel lobby, “American Cynic” bounces back into intense, late 80s MTV vibes, though “The Otherside” slows it all down for us, the instrumentals harnessing energy from late 90s love songs as we head into the intense, hard-hitting sounds of “Animal”. While ninth track “What Does It Mean” takes on an “80s slow dance at prom” vibe, tenth track “Break” is a track music supervisors should keep their ears on for any upcoming coming-of-age projects, if we’re being completely honest.

“Feel It Boy” is energetic, fun, and something we can get on board with lyrically and sonically. “Fade Out” takes on a more contemporary pop sound that slightly overshadows the 80s vibes, with quirky percussion and beautiful, entrancing lyrics. It rounds the album out quite nicely, and gets us in the mood for a dance party like no other.

Keep up with VHS Collection here.