city silos, “give it to me straight”

city silos, “give it to me straight”

Nashville-based alternative rock duo CITY SILOS have harnessed an effortlessly cool vibe in their latest single “Give It To Me Straight.” Also known as Chris and Kristen Butler, they work together as husband and wife to create a track that is as catchy as it is full of vulnerability and angst. Kristen’s voice is reminiscent of Paramore’s Hayley Williams with her powerful range and ability to bring a certain raw emotion to the song. What makes this song stand out is that it is something you can dance around your room to, but also relate to it’s revelations about being in a dead-end relationship. “Give It To Me Straight” is just a sliver of what’s to come — their debut full-length album Happy Thoughts is to be released on August 30th.

Keep up with City Silos here.

meg myers, “running up that hill”

meg myers, “running up that hill”

Los Angeles-based Meg Myers brings her own colorful spirit to this cover of Kate Bush’s “Running Up That Hill.”  The original version is known for its major success in 1985 and a music video that featured a contemporary dance routine performed by Bush herself. On the other hand, Myers’ version showcases the artistic talents of 2,130 children, and the artwork paired with her distinctly inimitable vocals creates quite an enchanting combination. “Running Up That Hill” is a song that means a lot to many people and Kate Bush is beloved in the world of music. But, in spite of that pressure, Myers manages to stay true to the original as well as produce her own creative vision. It is clear that this song is near and dear to Myers as well, and she embraces that completely. 

The video itself is a massive creative feat – it took a chance on over two thousand children to be able to convey the story that the song is trying to tell. The vibrant imagery of a winged Myers flying through space stands out in a way that really showcases childlike wonder and imagination. The amount of work put into the video shows how a fully formed concept can evolve into one of the most beautiful music videos that I have seen in a long time.

Be sure to check out the video, and keep up with Meg Myers here.

wild wing, new futures

wild wing, new futures

Wild Wing’s fourth record New Futures is the epitome of eclectic rock-and-roll. Growing up together in Los Angeles, band members David Gantz, Max Garland, Zach Miller, and Theo Cohn continue to display an unbreakable bond as well as showcase their musical talents as a bonafide rock band.

The record completely redefines the rock genre by including punk, pop, and electronic influences that as jarring as they are the perfect match for each individual song. From the electronica instrumental of “Futures (Intro)” to the screamo sounds of “Triumph” to the rock-and-roll anthem of “Momma’s Got a Brand New Bag” to the country twang of “Ontario,” each song takes you to a whole other place, which is essentially what makes Wild Wing so wild in their approach to music. Their openness towards experimentation allows for New Futures to capture the essence of true rock-and-roll.

Be sure to check out New Futures for yourself, and keep up with Wild Wing here.

wrinkles, “thunderstorm”

wrinkles, “thunderstorm”

Indie rock band Wrinkles puts an emphasis on carefree fun in the music video for their latest single, “Thunderstorm.” In the depths of a Montana winter, we see the five-piece band put their house to the test as they gather every blanket, pillow, tool, and instrument possible to create some sort of musical fortress. The video has a very exciting, TV-sitcom vibe that focuses on who Wrinkles is as a band and highlights their talent as well as their obvious camaraderie. While this is a lighthearted video, it shows the importance of a band’s strong connection not only as musicians, but as friends. As a result, the video – directed by Kendall Rock – perfectly matches the upbeat and catchy qualities of the track.

“Thunderstorm” is the first single off Wrinkles’ sophomore album Other Days, which comes out on August 14th.  Check out the music video, and keep up with the band here.

Other Days Tour Dates
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8.7 – Missoula
8.16 – Helena
8.17 – Bozeman
8.22 – Seattle
8.23 – Vancouver
8.24 – Bellingham
8.25 – Portland
8.26 – Corvallis
8.27 – Eugene
8.28 – San Francisco
8.29 – Oakland
8.30 – Los Angeles
8.31 – San Diego
9.1 – Phoenix
9.2 – Tucson
9.3 – El Paso
9.4 – Marfa
9.5 – Austin
9.6 – Houston
9.7 – Baton Rouge
9.8 – New Orleans
9.9 – Memphis
9.10 – Nashville
9.11 – Athens
9.12 – Asheville
9.13 – Richmond
9.14 – Baltimore / DC
9.15 – Philadelphia
9.16 – Asbury Park
9.17 – New York
9.18 – Amherst
9.19 – Albany
9.20 – Montreal
9.21 – Toronto
9.22 – Hamilton
9.23 – Detroit
9.24 – Chicago
9.25 – St Louis
9.26 – Kansas City
9.27 – Omaha
9.28 – Denver
9.29 – Ft Collins
9.30 – Bozeman

thomas kozumplik, child of the earth

thomas kozumplik, child of the earth

Composer and performer Thomas Kozumplik leads a 16-member orchestra in a riveting  performance of instrumental artistry with his latest project, Child of the Earth.
“Mother Nature (la inocencia pérdida)” is quite an attention-grabbing opening — with the cacophony of various bells and drum beats and piano chords that doesn’t quite allow you to figure out where the song is headed —mirroring the beauty and unpredictability of Mother Nature itself. Then it shifts with the use of heavy percussion and ominous vocal work that creates an intense juxtaposition to the first few minutes. As the composition comes to an end, it settles back down, bringing back the playful xylophone, plus some piano chords and vocals that ring with finality.
The next two tracks are the small but sweet filling between the two thick pieces of bread in this orchestral sandwich. “Mysticism (Carillon) resembles a wind chime in its breezy tone. It is the most serene of the tracks, bringing about a certain peace and calm that only chimes can do. “A Journey (baile de los tambores)” goes back to the more chaotic sound of “Mother Nature.” The intense yet catchy drum beats are a mirror opposite to the quiet romance of “Mysticism.”
“Beauty and its Passing (cuando habíamos podido amar)” is quite a triumphant ending to this large-scale orchestra. It is a more subdued work in a way that is more contemplative. For most of the song, the signature heavy percussion is not present, putting piano and marimba at the forefront, as a way of bringing the intensity of the orchestra to a gentle close.
Child of the Earth is an incredible feat. His work and artistry certainly speak for themselves — Kozumplik manages to create something entirely new and interesting, allowing listeners to disappear into a world of magical music.
Be sure to check out the album, and keep up with Kozumplik here.